Connecticut Voices For Children

Our Mission

We provide trusted, quality research, recommendations and advocacy that advance public policy and investments to improve the well-being of Connecticut’s children and families, specifically those that have been historically disadvantaged.

All Connecticut children can reach their full potential when we embrace diverse identities and remove barriers to well-being.

Our Priorities
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Family Economic Security

Today, the state’s income and wealth divides are greater than ever, but so much of a child’s well-being is rooted in family economic security. Children cannot thrive unless families do, which is why Connecticut Voices conducts research and analysis as well as works with stakeholders and partners to co-create recommendations and advance advocacy that support housing, criminal justice, and employment as well as the intersectional issues of health, child welfare, and education.

Fiscal & Economics

Budgets are a clear reflection of what and who we value. Connecticut Voices identifies and advocates for investments in children and families as the primary budget priority, but we also conduct research and work with stakeholders and partners to co-create recommendations and advance advocacy that support inclusive growth and a fair tax system within the state.

Emerging Issues

The world and state are changing rapidly and we recognize that to keep up with the pace of these changes, we must be nimble and adapt, and address issues and emergencies when they arise, which is why Connecticut Voices identifies new, timely issues and conducts research and analysis as well as works with stakeholders and partners to co-create recommendations and advance advocacy that are of the most emergent import to the well-being of the state’s children and families.

We Have A Choice.

A statement from Connecticut Voices for Children

Dear Voices Community –

Connecticut Voices for Children stands in solidarity with the Black community. We are outraged by the murder of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery. However, we are not surprised by these senseless deaths because state sanctioned violence and other inequitable policies have harmed Black people in this country for centuries.

Inequitable policies, centered in racism, permeate our systems and structures. While the world now sees these inequities within our criminal justice system, countless policies within our systems of employment, housing, education and others have equally terrorized people of color. These inequities, at best, have robbed people of color of opportunities, and continue to do so….

The entire statement can be found here.

Connecticut Voices for Children Report Release - May 27, 2020

Beyond Exclusionary Discipline: Re-Conceptualizing Connecticut's School to Prison Pipeline to Address Root Causes

Connecticut Voices for Children released a report that examines Connecticut’s school to prison pipeline and the racial disparities that exist across programs and systems. The report, entitled “Beyond Exclusionary Discipline: Re-Conceptualizing Connecticut’s School to Prison Pipeline to Address Root Causes,” identifies several structural and systemic factors that push students through the school to prison pipeline, which fall into three categories: discrimination, physical and mental well-being, and socioeconomic status.  Additionally, Connecticut Voices for Children offers recommendations that seek to mitigate the factors that make it more difficult for students to achieve in school and put students at an increased risk of facing exclusionary discipline and justice system involvement.

Just Facts Just Research

CT Voices partners with The Narrative Project, a communications consultancy. Press inquiries on this report should be directed to The Narrative Project via email at media@narrative-project.com or telephone at 203-913-5008

Connecticut Voices for Children *Crisis Response Report* - April 23, 2020

Federal Efforts to Address the Coronavirus Pandemic & the Ensuing and Precipitous Economic Downturn

*Now with an epilogue that outlines the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act (P.L. 116-139)*

Connecticut Voices for Children released a report that outlines the three, large, coronavirus-related Congressional bills to date. The report, entitled “Federal Efforts to Address the Coronavirus Pandemic & the Ensuing and Precipitous Economic Downturn” examines The Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (P.L. 116-123), which became law on March 6, 2020; The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (P.L. 116-127), which became law on March 18, 2020; and The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act (P.L. 116-136), which became law March 27, 2020.  This report, in three parts, describes the key provisions of these federal efforts, with emphasis on those most relevant to Connecticut children and families.

Just Research

Connecticut Voices for Children will host a webinar and Q&A with the report’s author on Tuesday, May 5, 2020 from 2pm – 3pm.  The webinar will be geared to municipal elected officials but is open to everyone.

CT Voices partners with The Narrative Project, a communications consultancy. Press inquiries on this report should be directed to The Narrative Project via email at media@narrative-project.com or telephone at 203-913-5008

Connecticut Voices for Children *Crisis Response Report* - April 21, 2020

The State of Early Childhood: Can Connecticut's Struggling Family Child Care Providers Fill a 50,000 Child Care Gap Amidst the Coronavirus Recession?

Connecticut Voices for Children released a second crisis response report, as part of a series of reports, that outlines what the state can do to support children and families during and after the COVID-19 crisis. The report, entitled “The State of Early Childhood: Can Connecticut’s Struggling Family Child Care Providers Fill a 50,000 Child Care Gap Amidst the Coronavirus Recession?” examines the status of Connecticut’s child care industry, specifically family child care providers, before the coronavirus pandemic and finds the state continues to see the following: a shortage of child care slots, high child care costs that are not affordable to most families, and a continuing divide between preschool experience between higher- and lower-income towns. The report explores responses to the pandemic that can help state policymakers create a stronger early childhood environment necessary for rebuilding Connecticut’s economy.

Just Facts Just Research

CT Voices partners with The Narrative Project, a communications consultancy. Press inquiries on this report should be directed to The Narrative Project via email at media@narrative-project.com or telephone at 203-913-5008

Advocacy, News & Events

Connecticut College and Career Readiness Alliance Convening 2020

February 11th, 2020

Issue Campaigns

  • July 2, 2020 | Education & Employment, Emerging Issues, Fiscal & Economics, Rights & Justice

    Counselors Not Cops

@CTVoices | Connecticut Voices for Children


Meanwhile, students in schools that employ SROs are more likely to face punishment, expulsion, and arrest than students in schools that do not employ SROs—thereby exacerbating the school to prison pipeline.

About 2 days ago from CT Voices for Children's Twitter via Twitter Web App